Coconut Ginger Granola

May 15, 2011 at 7:53 am | Posted in Diet / Nutrition | 1 Comment
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To be able to be my fittest and healthiest and to have my girls be theirs, I make our granola- What I made for the next two weeks or so-Coconut Ginger Granola.  This is great for regular breakfast of course, but is particularly nice to have on hand for comp days- before, after, and even during the events.

Coconut Ginger Granola Recipe

Ingredients
• 8 cups rolled oats
• 1 1/2 cups ground flax seeds
• 1 cup grated unsweetened coconut
• 1 cup sunflower seeds
• 1 cup coarsely chopped almonds
• 1 cup coarsely chopped pecans
• 1 cup coarsely chopped walnuts
• 2 cups sweetened dried cranberries
• 1/2 cup molasses
• 1 cup coconut milk
• 3/4 cup honey ginger spread
• 1 cup vegetable oil
• 1 tablespoon ground cinnamon
• 1 teaspoon ground cloves
• 1 tablespoon ground ginger
• 2 tablespoon vanilla extract

Directions

  1. Preheat the oven to 325 degrees F (165 degrees C). Line two large baking sheets with parchment or aluminum foil.
  2. Combine the oats, flax seeds, coconut, sunflower seeds, almonds, pecans, walnuts, and cranberries in a large bowl. Stir together molasses, coconut milk, honey ginger spread, oil, cinnamon, cloves, ginger, and vanilla in a saucepan. Bring to a boil over medium heat, then pour over the dry ingredients, and stir to coat. Spread the mixture out evenly on the baking sheets.
  3. Bake in the preheated oven until crispy and toasted, about 20 minutes. Stir once halfway through. Cool completely before storing in an airtight container.

Zip Line Day

May 14, 2011 at 10:36 am | Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

On the Waterville Valley Rec Bus

More of the bus ride.

Why the helmets? We were in a six wheel off road vehicle.

Heading off with the GO-PRO

Running off with a sister is one of the best options to fly.

Hanging out in the trees.

Oh Yeah- FUN!

Family Day at Tuckerman’s Ravine

May 13, 2011 at 6:34 am | Posted in attitudes | Leave a comment
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Yesterday I went up to Tuckerman’s Ravine on MT Washington with my three younger daughters.  To get there you need to hike with your skis and boots, water and food up to the base of the ravine.  It’s not a really hard climb till you get to the last .7 mile.  Then it is all rocks, snow, and ice.  But we were all very comfortable on this hard spot.

On the way up, Jamie and Jeanee somehow found a couple of cute boys and up they went with them.  They had a great time chatting, which of course makes the trip that much more enjoyable and easy.

Jilly and I were a bit slower, but not by much.  I told Jilly a very long and detailed version of The Little Blue Engine That Could.  I really love telling these kinds of stories while hiking.

This was Jamie’s first real physical adventure since her ACL reconstruction operation last January.  She had her physical therapist’s OK.  She was very strong and actually less tired or stiff than others at the end of the day. (Maybe because she wasn’t allowed to carry anything??? Or because she was actually that strong????- I have to say I think the latter.)

Jeanee climbed up to the top of the left gully, past the choke.  She was the leader of a group of five.  She was amazing.  She just calmly went up- making it up there without any difficulty at all.  The gully had a few snow chutes.  This is where the top snow goes to make a stream of snow.  It’s actually a small, in control avalanche.  So the skiing up there is really tricky!  Jeanee came down with complete control and ease!  BOTH times.

My dog, Lyona, was with us.  She is a small bishon/shitzu mix dog who in the winter has a very thick, long coat of hair.  But she just had her spring shave on Monday so had to wear a sweater yesterday.  It was a nice contrast to see the little “Cutesy” dog running up the mountain just like a dog is supposed to do.  Anyway, she was following Jeanee up the left gully when a skier started down.  She jumped in the snow chute and slid ½ way down. You could see that she was laughing and wagging her tail.  Funny dog!

Jilly went up to the bottom of the rocks and had a good couple of turns from there.  She thought once was enough- not the skiing but the hiking up.

I went to the bottom of the rocks with Jilly.  I loved it.  But for some reason I had this fear take over me.  I skied across for a while and then finally had to make myself do this jump-start to get turning.  The snow and pitch were different than what I am used to but not so difficult that I needed to be afraid.

Then I went up a second time.  I was on my way up the left gully but decided I didn’t really want to go there.  So I climbed across the bowl just above a section of brush and below a section of rock outcrop.  It was an adventure in and of itself.  At one point there was a rushing stream under the snow.  So I had to figure out how to go across it without going deep through the snow.  Then at the end there just happened to be a small 8-foot cliff- and a crevice.  No easy jump off.  I did manage to find a way to hold onto the scrub and crab crawl out.  BUT one of my skis got away from me.

It fell in the crevice!

But ever resourceful as I am- I asked a tall man coming up if he could help me.  He was not exactly overjoyed with the idea, but felt a bit compelled.  Because of his length he was able to fish the ski out a bit so he could pull it out the rest of the way.

Again I had the same stop fear I had the first time.  And this time I knew the snow and pitch.  SO I stood there in the middle having a talk with myself.  Right out there in front of anyone- in particular my daughters.  I really had to ask myself why was I scared? Why was I holding myself back?  Had anything every happened to anyone I knew personally in Tuckerman’s?  Had I known plenty of people who had hurt themselves in very easy conditions?  I had this talk with myself for at a couple of hours- Maybe even the whole day. (In reality it was only a couple of minutes) I began to wonder about myself.  What was wrong with me anyway?  Why was I so scared?  And then I remembered my story to Jilly.  The Little Blue Engine That Could.  I had told this story to Jilly to give her entertainment and strength to get up the mountain and here I was – her 52-year-old mother who needed to listen to the moral of my particular version of the story.

My version the engine finally gets up and over the mountain using her attitude with her whole heart and soul, as well as everything she did to be prepared.

So I knew I was prepared.  I had the skills and strength.  All I needed was my attitude of heart and soul love for skiing.  Once I got myself figured out, I jumped off and had a great set of turns.

There is really something so special about Tuck’s.  The spring songbirds are tweeting away.  The air is soft and cool.  The other mountains are all green and lush.  The water is gushing all around- even waterfalls within the bowl.  It’s similar to glacier skiing but not exactly like it. It’s a very unique and special way to spend the day.

After that we began our descent.  We could ski about 1/3 down and walked after that.  At the bottom we stretched doing yoga.

At one point we were all unloading our packs and putting the skis in the cat when all of a sudden we couldn’t see where Lyona was.  I whistled.  Began to look around quickly when she looked up from the middle seat of the car where she had gone soundly to sleep.  She was saying, “Really more?  I LOVED it but now it time to sleep!”

Great day and, as always, great people we met on the way.

51 Ideas of Starting Wellness and Fitness

May 4, 2011 at 8:49 pm | Posted in Health | Leave a comment
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1.   To improve power in legs, hips, core, shoulder complex, or arms you need to do integrated full body power training

2.   You are greater risk for injury when you don’t have full body training.

3.   Improve your body composition levels with power-based training

4.   During exercise training session one of most efficient methods of expending energy is full body power training.

5.   Before power training you need to have stability, mobility, strength, and skills training.

6.   Power training develops lean muscles

7.   Type II muscle fibers create high force, short duration contractions, and enhance muscle size and definition-

8.   Power training uses type II muscles

9.   For long term progression have an organized system of training- this is for exercising and everything in life

10.    The first thing to do when starting aerobic training is to establish baseline aerobic fitness

11.    By creating a stable aerobic base you can build improvements in health, endurance, energy, mood, and burning calories.

12.    Depending on your goals, training, and initial fitness level will determine how fast you progress with improving your health and strength.

13.    When starting aerobic exercise- do steady and low intensity. It’s good to start slowly. You can build up as you go

14.    If you want to go anywhere do anything- then start. Nothing huge or monumental needs to be done. You just need to start.

15.    When you start with your thoughts you have made an action. That’s why the greatest athletes visualize all the time.

16.    To be sure you are starting at a level that is right for you do the talk test- be able to talk as a beginner exerciser.

17.    The initial duration of aerobic exercise may be only five minutes! You can do that.

18.    You can progress from your initial duration of aerobic exercise in very small increments- keep a log so you know that you are improving.

19.    The goal of aerobic exercise to get to 3-5 days/wk for 20-30 minutes each time.

20.    With regular aerobic exercise you will have improved health, endurance, energy expenditure- meaning you will actually have more energy!

21.    Regular aerobic exercise decreases stress and improves your ability to do your activities of daily living.

22.    You don’t need an assessment to start aerobic exercise if you are a regularly healthy person-

23.    Aerobic efficiency training is increased duration and frequency of sessions and adding interval training.

24.    Add aerobic intervals just above the talk test level

25.    When you add intervals to aerobic training you use fat as your fuel source!

26.    Intervals add interesting things to do while doing aerobic exercise. Besides you have to think and stay alert.

27.    Anaerobic training means without oxygen- the muscles are not in the same need of oxygen.

28.    When you get strong enough you can do anaerobic exercise.

29.    Tolerance training is designed to increase the amount of sustained work you can do at a high level. at or near the VT2

30.    Tolerance training also improves the muscles to produce force for longer periods of time

31.    Endurance training can be 3-7 days/wk lasting 20 in to several hours

32.    World-class endurance athletes only spend minimal training at highest peak levels. Most is at steady state, with about 1/4 doing intervals

33.    Three zones for aerobic exercise- Zone 1 at/Below talk test-70-80%, Zone 2 above talk test 10%, Zone 3 above VT2 (very intense) 10-20%

34.    Rest and Recovery exercises are critical for sustained ability and increased strength.

35.    Signs of over training- increased resting heart rate, disturbed sleep, decreased hunger on multiple days

36.    Recovery is crucial in improving fitness and performance.

37.    It is more important to recover fully rather than have the body get is a state of fatigue. This leads to over training and injury

38.    The most important goal is to have an initial positive experience promoting adherence through easily achieved successes

39.    Being in action will have an overall impact on your health and quality of life- as well as state of physical and mental fitness

40.    You need to have personal training that is systematic with a program solution especially designed for you.

41.    Find happiness within yourself. Then share yourself with others

42.    To be healthy: eat right, walk right and talk to yourself right.

43.    A personal trainer facilitates change to help you through your stages of increasing fitness and well-being.

44.    As a helper of change a fitness trainer creates conditions and uses techniques to help you create your desired out come

45.    One of the most critical factors to choose your wellness trainer is how you get along with the trainer

46.    Be sure your fitness trainer does a thorough health assessment to start you right where it’s best for you

47.    You must have trust and respect or you will go unheard

48.    Your first impression-the blink moment- is really the most critical. Best way to be is totally genuine-anything else will be known

49.    Rapport is a relationship of mutual trust harmony or emotional affinity enabling mutual respect and understanding

50.    Three essential attributes for a good relationship-Empathy, Warmth, Being genuine.

51.    Empathy- ability to understand another’s world without having to live it.

Parents-Encourage and Inspire your Girl Athletes

May 1, 2011 at 8:00 pm | Posted in Self Esteem | 1 Comment
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I didn’t get any exercise for me in today.  Still I had a great day-  I watched two lacrosse games.  The first was U13 girls- meaning the girls were all younger than 13 on Jan 1 2011.  This team has 16 players with 8 who have never played before and the girls range down in age to 8- So a very inexperienced and young team.  The first half was a wash out.  The other team totally creamed us.  1-13.

Not really sure how a coach could have allowed or encouraged such a slaughter at this age, but instead of totally giving up my daughter’s team kept trying.  We had two time outs when the coach spent the time totally encouraging the girls.  There was so much she could have been negative about, but she chose to talk about every little strength that the girls gave.  She also gave them specific practical skills to try.  After each time out the girls came back stronger.

The second half was a new game, with the final score being 4 to 14 (or the half being 2-3 in our favor)  So what made this difference?  Why didn’t these girls play this way for the first half?  And most importantly why did these girls go for it the second half?

Of course I told you about the coach.  But as parents we played our part.

  • We stayed attentive to the whole game. In other words we did not start to chat amongst our selves with an attitude of not caring since the girls obviously had no chance of winning.
  • We cheered and supported the girls efforts.  No one yelled about all the possible plays the girls could have made.  No one moaned when the goalie let yet another goal in.
  • Our remarks were enthusiastic and encouraging.  We yelled for sure, when the girls ran with the ball, scooped it up, made an attempt at a shot.
  • We ignored commenting about the slaughter attempt.  If anything we used the slaughter attempt to instill energy and enthusiasm in the girls.

This is the important thing. Really the ONLY thing that matters to young athletes- Our girls came off the field feeling good.  The score was not the important part.  What was important was that they actually learned to play the game.  That they were out there trying their best.  That it was lots of fun and exciting to run up and down the field.

As a parent/coach/athlete I urge you to encourage and inspire your girls. And have fun while doing it.

Love the journey

May 1, 2011 at 6:48 am | Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Know how to live life to the fullest-  Love the journey not the destination.

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